WHAT'S ON

    


A selection of work by artists who belong to the Print Council Aotearoa New Zealand


Friday 16 July – Sunday 8 August 2021

MAIN GALLERY

The Print Council encourages and stimulates printmaking throughout New Zealand. The prints included in this exhibition are evidence of the continued revival of printmaking in New Zealand and include new artists and new techniques.

Artwork: Dragon Arum by MB Stoneman, monotype and gold leaf

    


Coming Home Series, Ocean Birds

VALERIE CUTHBERT


Polyester plate lithography and drypoint 1/2—$500

The first print in this Coming Home series in 2020 focussed on the smaller shore and land birds of New Zealand facing extinction. This one is about the larger ocean birds who are similarly deeply affected by predation, bycatch, loss of habitat, plastics and everything connected with climate change and whose numbers have declined by 70% since the 1950’s.

Over 30,000 New Zealanders returned home during the pandemic to join the team of 5 million; some have stayed, some left already for better prospects. But the future for the ocean seabirds remains the same. They do not have a choice.


Busy Season

ANTONIA O'MAHONY


Etching, aquatint, linocut and watercolour—$850


     


Running Wild (detail)

ANTONIA O'MAHONY


Etching, aquatint, linocut and watercolour—$850

These pieces are from a recent solo exhibition titled ‘274 Days Till Summer’. Rather than using found imagery for collage, I use my own hand-drawn and hand-printed matter, therefore reorienting the ideas and content of past work.


Nocturne

LISA FEYEN


Linocut on paper (unica)—$550

This work is a reflection of my experience of the 2020 Covid lockdown, and the subsequent feeling of freedom as the restrictions were lifted. Moths were a recurring theme for me during 2020, and represent creatures that exist in the night but are drawn to the light, much like an artist who works alone in their studio.


Night Flight

JULIE MOONLIGHT


Reduction linocut printed in four colours on Fabriano paper—$350

In 2020, and for some of 2021, we were unusually restricted to our ‘bubbles’ or to socially distance from other people or places.

My images capture the freedom of life without boundaries that birds and nature were able to continue to enjoy, without fear of this unseen enemy. These images are of places I enjoy; going to the beach or for a bush walk, getting close to nature and breathing in the fresh air.
They are symbols of life and freedom.

I love printmaking and the unique lines, marks and textures that can be achieved. These prints are reduction linocuts.


     


Tui

LYNNE WILBURN


Waterless lithography—$150

After the events and challenges of the last year, ‘Looking Forward’ has a number of different facets for me. I give thanks for the wonderful things my life; the support of family and friends and the natural environment that I learned to appreciate again during the Covid lockdowns; those little details that I was too busy before to notice. I have hope that from the difficult times, we can all re-evaluate what is important to each of us and find a renewed hope and positivity as we move forward into the future.


Looking Out

JENNY BIELAWSKI


Intaglio print with surface leaf prints on recycled silk—$250

Two Teddies looking out; a little message to remind us to continue to look out for each other at all times


Bright Futures in the Stings

CATHERINE GODWIN


Digital Image Transfer with uniball detail—$160

Recently I have been working with dots and circular forms.

This work is from a series of photographic images I took whilst walking in the eastern blocks of Hastings which the Hastings City Council is revitalizing to bring more people into the city and build a brighter future for the city. The Opera House earthquake-strengthening and beautification, is a small part of this work. My image takes in the old and new architectural forms which include many circular shapes.

The circle represents regeneration. The symbolism of my image is partnered with the recognized value and beauty of circular forms throughout European history.


     


Flight Path Through My Kitchen 2

HILARY RAMAGE


Woodcut, monoprint, collage 4/10—$250

These two prints are about sitting in my kitchen with memorabilia from my travels all around me; remembering people and places, a cup of tea in hand, thinking of the places I may go when this pandemic is really passed.


Perchance to Dream

JULIA ELLERY


Drypoint etching and mixed media print—$500

Perchance to dream. Reflecting on future plans.


Looking Back to the Future

CATHERINE MACDONALD


Drypoint—$290

There is a cyclic nature to life
then something will happen
that disrupts the cycle
and past works
have new meaning


Pomegranate

MICHAELA STONEMAN


Cyanotype—$260 each , $500 set


     


Poppy

MICHAELA STONEMAN


Cyanotype—$260 each , $500 set

Humans have a curious and far-reaching relationship with plants, with strands of meaning and connection threaded throughout history.

In the Victorian era, flowers were used to deliver messages, offering a complex language to communicate intimate or malevolent sentiments. They allowed people to express feelings which otherwise could not be spoken.

Our mutually beneficial relationship with the plant kingdom is conscious and endless.


     


Nest 5

ROSEMARY MORTIMER


Intaglio from found object, 10/20—$295

Making prints from the detritus of nature and industry allows me to embrace the discarded without being outed as a ‘hoarder’.

The abandoned nests I print in my Te Horo studio, incorporate diverse materials: building waste, horsehair, baling twine, hay, feathers... the birds use whatever they can find in their local environment.

In this process there is no drawing, no plate, the nests are printed unaltered. Oily ink manipulated directly into the fragile construction records its gradual disintegration through the printmaking process.


     


Egmont St. South 3

CAROLYN CURRIE


Monoprint—printing ink—$360 SOLD

Transitional spaces, liminal spaces, alleyways: these spaces and places are a natural part of our lives - we pass through them every day without giving them a second thought. They are a threshold to another destination.

When looking for subject matter, I try not to be distracted by the obvious, and focus on things that are frequently overlooked by others - finding beauty and interest in unusual objects or places. My process could be described as spontaneous - often evolving as I work.

These works focus on two particular lane-ways; Opera House Lane and Egmont Street - both in Wellington.


Mt. Taranaki Lighthouse

NIC TUCKER


Woodblock prints on Fabriano and Hahn paper—$385

My works represent our connection to our whenua


Bursting

FAYE CHADBURN


Collaged original screenprint, framed—$490

I use a combination of screenprint stenciling techniques to produce unique work on paper. These pieces are part of an ongoing ‘Chop’ series of collages; inspired by a past life working in a production kitchen in the UK. They are created from discarded prints, cut-up and arranged in a way not too dissimilar from making salad.

During the lockdown of 2020 I became more fascinated than ever by the patterns in our natural world. Looking forward, I aim to honor these inborn rhythms, where discipline and adaptability are equally essential ingredients.


     


Blue Print Series 4

BETH CHARLES


Monoprint and emboss, oil-based ink on paper. Japanese vintage and modern fabric collage, button—$500

The prints are inspired by Japanese Boro textiles. The essence of the Boro tradition is the reuse of fabrics (which were mostly dyed indigo) through mending, patching and remaking.

The philosophy of re-use and the avoidance of waste is now finding new meaning as we recognise the need to reduce global consumption.


A New Dawn

BRENDA WALLIS


Woodcut relief print onto Mitsumata 31gsm attached to Tiepolo 290gsm—$100

Since the onset of Covid 19 the world seems to have shrunk and options for travel and personal connections have become increasingly limited. My life has become simpler and in this work I have reflected this process by using the comparatively simpler process of relief printmaking to express my thoughts and feelings.

This work conveys the seemingly dark places, that even within nature, can seem overwhelming.

It is also about moving my focus to the rising sun; to new hope and optimism as we embrace each new day.

Looking Forward to new beginnings.


Legacy (detail)

DIANE HARRIES


Screenprint, collagraph, paper, card, linen thread—NFS

The landowner who saved the patch of lowland kahikatea swamp forest in Whanganui now known as Gordons Bush has left us a priceless legacy. All that remains of the original homestead site is an old bunya tree. It still lives, but many of the kahikatea trees near the edges of the reserve have died following drainage of the surrounding farmland.


     


Rockpool

ANNIE DOORNEBOSCH


Collagraph, watercolour, ink/linocut—$250

I love to create original print designs incorporating botanicals and native flora and fauna. My work often also includes hints of New Zealand’s cultural influences and landscape. I hand-carve woodcut and linocut plate designs to print as relief prints as well as creating collagraph and drypoint intaglio prints. All of my works are limited edition prints using fine art paper and soy-based ink. I work from my home studio in Greytown. I am a member of the New Zealand Print Council, WaiArt, Conart, Featherston Art Group and the Masterton Art Club.


In the Balance I

INA ARRAOUI


Woodblock printed on cotton with hand-stitched embroidery—$360

Woodblock print by Ina Arraoui
Hand-stitched embroidery by Lina Castro.


These works speak to the resilience of humanity in the face of the global pandemic. Faced with our own mortality, tiny moments of joy are no longer taken for granted but become the most cherished.

Our relationship to nature, others and ourselves is questioned, forcing us to adapt and think outside the box in order for us to continue and flourish.

These collaborative pieces are part of a larger body of work driven by the desire to connect, share and create new and exciting work in a cross-cultural context.


     


Finding Your Way

RACHEL SCHANZER


Metallic watercolours, lino prints, Charbonnel Aquawash ink—$155

Calm and possibilities post Level 4 lockdown were found for me as I walked on West Coast black sand beaches. This came from the ebb and flow of water and ever-changing traces of movement, light and texture on the sand.

A trip to the Catlin’s introduced me to the spellbounding tracks of voluminous Bull Kelp; dragged, swirled and pulled in and out of spaces around rocks and estuaries. The sublimely mesmerising movement touched me and was deeply re-energising.

I draw a deep sense of ‘Moving Forward’ from being in nature as a regular activity in my life.


Flatpack 3

KATHY BOYLE


Plaster, plywood, mixed media print—$500

My approach to printmaking tends to be experimental, and explores unexpected processes and materials.


Hindsight is 20/20

KATHY REILLY


Aquatint etchings, Venetian mask, blank cardboard, tissue, lead type, wire, magnets—$980

Like a Battleship, this Self is armed and ready to sail forth into new territory, with a reinforced bow of scientific knowledge to break through the ice of fear.


Who knows where this goes?

HAMISH MACAULAY


Two-plate monotype print - ink on paper—$300

I am inspired by nature, especially the coast. I’m drawn to colours, textures and layers that occur naturally, these scenes are always changing, some only visible for a fleeting moment, others taking a lifetime to create. In this monotype print, the image features colours from nature re-ordered, and mixed with metallics to illustrate the sheen of oil on stone.


Atua

JUDE GORDON


Solar plate printed on 280 gsm Tiepolo—$180

These prints are from an exhibition I had last year titled ‘Overture for Future Summers’. The works infer how we need to value and consider our native species, our taonga, when moving forward. The works, I hope, embody the spirit of the unique flora we have in this country.


Posit

JO ERNSTEN


Linocut on paper (unica)—$130

In my work I am interested in the limits of language. Words are loaded; it takes time reading between, around, and through the lines in order to know the truth of the telling.

This piece plays on how, despite the horrors of Covid, we were also given time to reflect on how we live and adjust our priorities. The window is closing.


     


Reflections (detail)

PAM HASTINGS


Collographs, woodcut, offset printing—$130

The theme of my works is ‘to look forward we may need to look back’. I see the beauty, maintenance and peace of the Botanical Gardens in Napier as a way of looking ahead and finding beauty in our surroundings. The old cemetery adjacent to the gardens is a reminder of our history and past events. Each grave has a story to tell, mostly unknown to us today. I hope that my prints reflect these ideas.


     


Elusive Daisy

HELEN DYNES


Waterless lithography, Chine collé—$100

I am a Napier-based artist/tutor with a background in painting and printmaking. As a returning member of the Print Council it was inspiring to work with the HB Inkers on the theme ‘Looking Forward’. Emigration and travel restrictions have presented many of us with thought-provoking challenges and feelings of disempowerment.

This brief gives us an opportunity to share in the uplifting message its title suggests.


     


Revelations II

RACHEL SCHANZER


Metallic watercolours, linoprints, Charbonnel Aquawash ink—$155

Calm and possibilities post Level 4 lockdown were found for me as I walked on West Coast black sand beaches. This came from the ebb and flow of water and ever-changing traces of movement, light and texture on the sand.

A trip to the Catlin’s introduced me to the spellbounding tracks of voluminous Bull Kelp; dragged, swirled and pulled in and out of spaces around rocks and estuaries. The sublimely mesmerising movement touched me and was deeply re-energising.

I draw a deep sense of ‘Moving Forward’ from being in nature as a regular activity in my life.

     


Day After Day

DIANNE HARRIES


Linocut, collagraph, paper, card—$600

The endangered Chatham petrel, Pterodroma axillaris, spends most of its life at sea, soaring over the ocean waves in every type of weather; a small vulnerable bird living the life of an albatross, and in need of our protection from the hazards of by-catch by fishermen, and competition for nesting sites on the Chatham Islands.

 

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